Sunday, 16 September 2012

Thought for the Day: Rich or Poor?

This article from 'Guardian Money' that was published earlier in the week is an interesting one which I'd urge you to read.   People, with a vast range of economic resources, gauge just how well off they believe they are.  Their responses didn't really surprise me.    Some describe what it truly is like to be economically poor with all the knock on effects of curtailing hopes and dreams that it involves.  There are those who feel rich if they can treat themselves to a meal in their work's canteen rather than having to pack a lunch everyday.   Then, at the other end of the spectrum, you get those 'poor' souls who really believe that they're hard up because they can't maintain their six bedroom houses and struggle to pay school fees and nannies.  Here, I find myself having to curb a decidedly bitchy side of my nature!

According to a bloke that I met on holiday I reckon that I am pretty near destitute.  He found it hard to contemplate how anyone could survive on a household income of  less than £50,000.  Yet, here I am on much less  living in a cosy home that is just the right size and layout to meet my needs.  I eat lush, mostly home cooked food but can afford the occasional meal out. My primary lifelong wish of travelling widely has been granted although I have to be resourceful to fund this.  And I spend quality time with my friends and family doing things that would  not be significantly different if I had a huge pot of money to play with.   So is Lovelygrey rich or poor?  That's a tricky question that I'll leave the rest of you to decide for me.

4 comments:

  1. It is a sad indictment of our world that we lost sight of what is important. I would say you are rich for all the right reasons.

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  2. I read that article. I think you have what is intrinsically the most valuable: cultural capital. You have a job, a family, something to do and something to look forward to. I'm the same. I'm also resourceful and positive and can have fun with family and friends even though I have no cash. I feel rich most of the time and count myself as comfortable as I have all I need and I can save, but I do so because I'm thrifty.

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  3. It's all relative isn't it? Our household income is lower than every one of those in the article except the asylum seeker, and next year it will fall to that of a pair of pensioners receiving state pension. I think a lot of it is down to attitude and choices. J came from what is deemed to be a run down council estate;I came from the 'best' suburb in town, yet his parents had a greater income than mine - they just made different choices about how to manage their income.

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  4. I am rich, on just under 9 grand a year. I have enough.

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