Friday, 21 March 2014

A Great Big Arty Curtain

Photo: Smithsonian.com
We're going back in time now, just a little way, in the Tardis that I keep in the back garden.  Of course, this is complete claptrap.  I haven't really got one.  Think of the disruption that I could cause to the space-time continuum and that would never do.  Instead I'm just reminiscing about my trip  to that beloved city, Barcelona at the start of this year  and specifically, to the Before the Horizon exhibition that I was so lucky to catch at  Fundacio Joan Miro.

Photo: Smithsonian Art Museum
While we were there I really miffed Louis off as I insisted on watching the entire film 'Running Fence' which was about three quarters of an hour long.  Hell, it was my holiday too. There's been plenty of times when I've sat around in playgrounds whilst he communed with other kids or where I've accompanied him to tortuous kiddie flicks starring cuddly creatures like hamsters.  G-Force springs to mind.  So  it was payback time.  I put my foot down and made him wait around whilst I did something that I wanted for a change. It seemed like a fair deal.

Image: Smithsonian American Art Museum
Back in the  mid 1970s, when I was a mere nipper trawling around the streets of Southend-on-Sea on my bike,  the artists Christo and Jeanne Claude were up to much grander things. They courted controversy and spent a couple of million dollars on erecting an 18 foot high fence made out of gleaming white nylon curtains hung on a steel frame which snaked for 24.5 miles across the Californian hills.  Eventually it just seemed to fall into the sea.  The installation stood for just 14 days.  Wow!

Needless to say it prompted a lot of the locals to voice strong opinions on what constitutes art and they weren't shy in making their opposition to the project known.  Of course, it goes without saying that I  absolutely 100 per cent love it!  It just screams audacity like no other artwork that I've ever seen.

2 comments:

  1. Christo was always a sub-hero of mine. I loved his wrapped buildings etc, but would never have 'bought' (even if such things were possible) anything that he'd done, or been involved in. I admire from a safe distance.

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  2. I like how their work was so temporary, the artworks were almost "happenings," despite years of planning.

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