Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Random Thoughts on Stuff

How did you do on Buy Nothing Day aka Black Friday?  I always start off with good intentions but then it goes tits up.  Sometimes I have to pop out for a forgotten essential ingredient in a recipe.  This year I bought wine, flowers and chocolate for those who kindly showed me hospitality last week.  I did think of nipping out the evening before to get them but I couldn't be arsed!

I've just finished the Stuffocation book that I bought the other day. It'll be passed on soon so it doesn't clutter up my home and become part of the problem that it tackles.  It was an interesting read and surprisingly didn't take an ultra-minimalist stance.  There's talk about how some of our possessions have intrinsic value because of the positive experiences that they give us.  That can be because of what they're used for, such as our hobbies, or it may be just that their presence in our lives lifts our spirits.  Like some of the arty stuff I've got around the house.  I like that idea. It's so William Morris.

Salty Dog and I came across this quote the other day which spoke to us loudly and clearly.  It feels particularly pertinent to me.  Last week I decided to honour a commitment rather than act in my own best interest in a situation where materially the stakes were high.  I'm feeling some disappointment but this is countered by the knowledge that I've done the right thing.  Even so,  I'm truly surprised by how many people think I should have looked after number one.  It's made me wonder about just how pervasive the practice of putting one's own self-interest first and foremost has become.

4 comments:

  1. I bought a jumper last week and paid with a card. The young assistant gave me my jumper and the receipt which I put in my purse. She then said "here is your receipt". I pointed out that she had already given me a receipt and gave the first one back to her. She replied ' oh thanks, that is our receipt". The older assistant glared at her and tutted loudly. I was telling a friend who replied "your'e an idiot, you would have got the jumper for nothing, why did you say anything?" I was shocked by her response, the young assistant made a mistake, why would anyone think it is okay to benefit from this? I may seem an idiot to some, but I have decent principles.

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    1. Yes I act in a similar way. I always let people know if they've given me the wrong change. x

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  2. I agree with William Morris' philosophy. I suppose I do still have too many possessions, but I've never followed fashion either in clothing or household things. Some things are kept out of sentimentality and remembrance, but I always try to use everything - so sad when after people die and you see all the things, probably given as gifts, still in the boxes.

    William Morris' Red House is near here and he used to walk down to our station for the train. A few years ago what looked like a small tombstone appeared on the steep grass bank one side of the road between the woods. Thinking it must be for someone's dog (Although we couldn't imagine how they got permission) we staggered up the bank, only to find it was a commemorative stone to him! - but it does look like a tombstone! ( he would probably remark that it was neither beautiful or useful)

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    1. I like the idea that you try to use everything. Whenever I've been given posh glasses they've been put to use to enjoy - even though it's inevitable that they will have a short life as I'm such a klutz! x

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