Saturday, 23 April 2016

By George!

Happy St George's Day one and all!  Let me say unequivocally that, even though  a little bit of Welsh, Scottish and Romany blood courses through my veins,  I am extremely proud to be English.  After all, it's the country where was born, raised and have lived for half a century.  In the main, it's a breathtakingly beautiful land.  We have everything:  forests, a stunning coastline, historic cites, mountains albeit titchy ones.  I even see that Dungeness beach has been dubbed England's only desert! Most of the natives are pretty friendly and our food, that used to be the butt of the world's jokes, is often superb.  We have a rather reasonable democracy and human rights record.

Yet national pride is something that my fellow countryfolk find it difficult to muster.   True we have a nasty past when it comes to raping and pillaging in other lands but surely we can't bear the sins of our forefathers forever?  What seems more prominent is a belief that pride in being English is seen to be commensurate with being  racist. often with violent undertones.  Our flag has sometimes been used to symbolise the dark and unwelcome in recent times.

A couple of World Cups ago, my co-workers stuck a big England flag in our office window in support of our national team.  We were told to take it down for fear it would be seen as racist.  I found this sad. For  I strongly believe that the moderate decent human beings in our country should be reclaiming the flag of St George for themselves. We need to show, like other countries do so well, that national pride does not have to equate to hatred and tolerance.

10 comments:

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    1. Good to know that I'm not entirely out of touch with other people's views. x

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  2. I would have never thought that a countries flag would seen as anything other than pride of home. It's not even remotely the same as the confederate flag, known as much more than just pride. Ihave Welsh heritage so along with all things union jack, wr brought home the Welsh Dragon from our trip. Would that country's flag get the same rap or just Englands?

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    1. I though Americans would be shocked. I think the Welsh are allowed to be proud. They have a great flag design wise to boot! x

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  3. Today is also the birthday of 2 of our cats, and the "official" birthday of the other two, as we don't know when they were born. George is so-called because of his birth-day. Millie, his sister, is named for Mildred. We had birthday cake for them (we being Mr Fd and I!) but we shared a dab of the cream with them. Happy Birthday, Cats!

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    1. Love the random wandering path your mind has taken here. Belated happy birthday to cats! x

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  4. I am too late to wish you greetings for the day but know that they were meant.

    I am pure Welsh and my parents would have been horrified to know that I married an Eglishman. I have lived in England for a long time but I am still, primarily, Welsh - secondly British - never European.

    Wasn't St. George Turkish?

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    1. Ah he might have been or Syrian. I think Wiki's out on this one. x

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  5. We also went around the world bringing roads, trains, agriculture, clean water, employment, education, and democracy, but no-one mentions that. I'm still amazed that the Irish go so bonkers over St Patrick's Day, yet the English ignore St George. I suppose it has something to do with national confidence.

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    1. Oops I forgot to mention those. And our language as well. x

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