Friday, 3 June 2016

Playing with Plants


Today I bring you our first vloggy post ever!  It's a bit ropey but we don't have a high scale production budget, just the Lovelygrey duo as crew and cast and a trusty old smartphone.   Blimey it's a bit of a palaver getting videos to upload over a campsite connection but I've finally done it. In the process I created my first little something in my own corner of Youtube.  The blogger platform didn't seem to want to play ball with me so I went off piste.

Have kids always played with plants?  I reckon so. There's the obvious examples.  Daisy chains, sticks as swords,  checking that your friends likes butter by holding a buttercup under their chin (everyone does), those spinning sycamore things and conkers, the bad boys of the plant world!  Then there's the sticky long stuff and the grass that we affectionately knew of in Essex as flea darts.  An unsuspecting victim in my day could go back to class with several bits of vegetation gleaned from the edges of the school field stuck to homemade '70s jumpers.  I think that my favourite was the bindweed flowers that were squeezed at the bottom and made to pop out of their calyx to the rhyme 'Grandfather, grandfather, pop out of bed!'  There were some of those near the postbox on the way home.

The good news is that, even in the computer age, these good old school play traditions have been passed down.    As I discovered on our Breton walk yesterday, Lou has new ones on me as well. There's a seed head that he shook near my ear to make a rattlesnake noise.  Then  he stripped a grass bare with a little poem about summer, winter and April showers. I  thought that  this weapon-based improvisation was particularly nifty!

12 comments:

  1. I remember all those plant based " tricks"!

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  2. We had "helicopter" races by climbing trees and then throwing the discy seed pods that twirl. Plant pistals are right up my ally.

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    1. Sound like sycamore to me or is this some native American plant? xx

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  3. I was hoping to see what you had bought from the garden centre.

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    1. Lordy, it's a long time since I've visited one of those places. However now my garden's looking tidier at home I might be in the market for an acer and some pots to grow herbs. xx

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  4. Brilliant - very professional.
    xx

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  5. (Show the tuft of flowering grass) Here's a tree in summer, (strip off the flowering bit)Here's a bunch of flowers
    (show the twiggy bit of grass stem) Here's a tree in winter
    (throw flowery bits at friend) and here's the April showers!

    We used to throw "sticky buds" at our friends - I suspect they are your flea darts

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    1. Yes that's the jobbie, although Lou's not allowed to throw plant matter over me. I get terrible hayfever and contact dermatitis from grass and all sorts of other vegetation. xx

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  6. My Dad used to make itching powder from rosehips!
    Arilx

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    1. So did I. Very effective! x

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    2. Did you know that the "pet name" for rosehips in France is "gratte cul" (itchy arse hole) as that's what you get if you eat them!!!

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  7. Every. Single. Day. I have to deal with sticking plant victims. It's still going on

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