Friday, 26 August 2016

Harping On

 We've spent the last two nights on the Quiberon Pennisula, the French equivalent of Portland.  At its narrowest point this little bit of land that juts out into the sea is just 22 metres wide.  Louis expressed concern that overnight it would break off, become an island and leave us stranded.  But it didn't happen.  We make our way overland back to the much bigger chunk of Breton proper today by four wheels. Phew!

Our aire was by this gorgeous bay on the Cote Sauvage where Lou dipped his toes in a lively sea.  Looks beautiful doesn't it?  Except the beach was strewn with rubbish and it took me two evenings of clearing it to get it to be acceptably clean.  It breaks my heart that fellow humans care so little for the world we live in.  How tortured they must be not to notice the damage they cause.

Now there's part of me that feels that if we do good it should be done without fanfare.  So ideally I'd like to do my litter picking without telling everyone.  But again, as I reported about my activities back in May on the Ile de Brehat,  I'm sharing my exploits in the hope that others join me.  I don't know if I'm making much impact but maybe; maybe. if I even save one or two animals over a year of litter picking on holiday and back at home  it'll be worth it.  And if I persuade anyone else that there's real dignity in this small act of cleaning our beautiful Earth then my efforts might be multiplied.  

8 comments:

  1. Good for you. Beautiful area could be so easily spoilt by rubbish. As I drove to work yesterday I once again saw an elderly couple walking along the lane with rubbish grabbers and bags. They seem to go out quite regularly doing this - bless them; but sad that people chuck rubbish out of car windows and also that budget cuts cant cover it. Have noticed also that lots of road signs are virtually hidden by bushes and trees at the moment. Nearlymissed my turning other day on a road in Basingstoke that I dont know. Enjoy rest of your hols rubbish free hopefully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The route to Louis' junior school got progressively more dangerous in the summer as bushes obscured the narrow pavement. I recall one of the dads cleared it himself. x

      Delete
  2. I often wonder why people don't pick up the litter outside their own house. How can they ignore a discarded plastic bottle, or wrapper, and walk past it day after day, week after week. Pure laziness. Where is the pride?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I try and pick up bits of litter on my travels. However sometimes I'm a bit preoccupied and miss it. One of my worst moments was when the wind blew my recycling bin over and it was my stuff strewn over the street. I felt so ashamed and, of course, went out to rectify the problem. Have windproofing for bin now! xx

      Delete
  3. I think it is wonderful that you are happy to spend your valuable holiday time picking up litter, if only everyone had the same idea. I don't understand people who litter at all, at home we clear up after ourselves, why is it any different when we are out and about? Enjoy the rest of your hols. Am not going away this year so am enjoying reading your holiday adventures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I actually enjoy litter picking. It's a bit like beachcombing. Glad you're enjoying my stories. It means a lot. xx

      Delete
  4. I will never understand people who litter, have they no soul?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They have one but it is troubled. xx

      Delete