Saturday, 6 August 2016

This Rocks




Oh goodie!  It looks like it's going to be sunny today across the country. No doubt many people will grab the rare chance to catch some weekend rays and head for the coast. So  I thought I'd give my post a traditional seaside slant.  For after all, little changes over the years.  If it ain't broken don't fix it! Like the generations before us, we  hire stripy deckchairs, paddle in the sea,  collect pebbles and shells, promenade on piers, build sandcastles and eat sugary crap.

Here, those boys from Pathe, show how the quintessential sweetie, that can be found on sale at any traditional English  resort, was made in the post war years.  I wonder if the manufacturing process is the same today.

7 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. Oops not sure what happened to your comment Frances. Think I might have been a bit butterfingered! x

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  2. Wow! That was interesting, I had never really thought about how they got the words in the rock but never would have guessed that it is made large and then pulled by hand! I imagine that the sale of rock is way down from when this video was made. Didn't the announcer sound "odd", is it the old recording or did people actually sound like that and I never noticed? JanF

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    1. I think that's the particular version of 'received pronunciation' that was considered normal in its day. When I was at Dartmouth Festival I got talking to a retired naval officer who spoke in the same way! x

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  3. Thanks for posting that, it took me back a lot of years. I still love rock and, if we ever get to the seaside, I always buy some and leave it in a drawer for a couple of years to get soft as I find it nicer to eat that way.

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    1. Yikes - I like my rock fresh. I know what you mean though about it softening. x

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