Monday, 30 January 2017

Yuk!

Even though Louis insists he's not a fussy eater and disguises the fact through his love of sushi, raw steak and strong stilton, he bloody well is. Entire food groups such as hot puddings and anything he subjectively categorises as 'spicy' are out of bounds. Some things have to be cooked the right way, for example, baked potatoes will not pass his lips whereas mash and chips are acceptable. There's staples such as toast, cereals, milk, fruit juice and raw tomatoes that are larger than cherry sized that he won't touch.  And don't even get me started on the things that he's liked for years and all of a sudden don't pass muster.

On the other hand I don't think that I'm  fussy at all.  Here the list of ten foods that I really don't like.  It was a struggle to compile. Only the first two ever cause a problem.
  • Baked beans:  Not the beans but that insipid sauce that'll ruin a fried breakfast by covering it in orange gloop.  I'm not adverse to using a can of beans though in a recipe where the taste is disguised.  Our favourite motorhome soup is a case in point.
  • Thick gravy:  The type of stuff made with Bisto granules that can overwhelms a lovely plate of sausage and mash or a roast.
  • Liver:  Horrid horrid strong tasting shoe leather. Thank goodness that liver and bacon is no longer standard fare.  To prove my non fussiness, I'm not adverse to it in pates, meatloaf or a rich ragu sauce.
  • Fizzy custard:  I have no idea what the latter really is but we were served this cream coloured milk based pudding at infant school with a hard biscuit floating in it.  Perhaps someone can enlighten me. Many  lunchtimes were spent in the canteen rather than playing outside while the dinner ladies failed miserably to make me eat this stuff.
  • Semolina and/or Prunes:  Again a nightmare from infant school days.  A  fellow pupil was sick in his pudding bowl once when they tried to force feed him.  It didn't help the situation.  Don't even think about letting me near a open tin of prunes.  Just the smell makes me gag.
  • Rooibos tea:  Again its the smell that's offputting.
  • Jellied Eels:  Tried once, loathed them.   Actually not keen on jelly as a savoury constituent of a meal but rather partial to the fruity varieties
  • Ghost Chilli Chocolate:  I still remember the pain. Not a food in my book.
  • Dates and figs:  Gritty little buggers fresh or dried
  • Banofee Pie:  I'll eat it but can't see what the fuss is about.

13 comments:

  1. I don't think that I am particularly fussy. Never tried jellied eels and no intention of doing so...that goes for oysters too. I did try mussels once when I was drunk, and they weren't as bad as I thought! No idea what fizzy custard could be. I used to make a delicious meal with lambs' liver. I cut it into thin slivers, made a " sauce" with onions, fried bacon pieces and tinned tomatoes, and then put the liver in at the end to cook gently in the heat of the sauce. No leather there! I did buy some red bush tea ages ago, but only tried it once....it must have been horrid! I never have banoffee pie or anything like that....much too sweet. Oh, and I once had to suffer Gazpacho....cold tomato and things! Supposed to be a soup I think..it was a starter at a friend's house. Don't know how I got it down.!!

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    1. Casserole sounds lovely in theory but still too liver-y! xx

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  2. Most of your list is not American fare, so safe assumption I won't be trying. Liver and tomato sauce neans, no thank you. Good list.

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    1. Re: US food. Not a fan of your Southern gravy either. xx

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  3. Hate, hate, hate liver, can't stand the look, the smell, the texture or taste. Once got a spanking for hiding pieces of it after I'd been left in the kitchen to finish my meal. Then my Mom felt bad and never made me eat anything again. Of course if I didn't like what we were having I could eat it or do without.

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    1. Didn't have the do without option in our house and loved was pretty much weekly. Never developed the taste.xx

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  4. I am finding it more and more difficult to eat meat cooked at home (by my partner) yet have no trouble at all with cured meats but I do at all times prefer to eat fish. Louis's palate will undoubtedly change as he get older, I think this happens to us all to some degree.

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  5. What a funny, personal post. Right now, with everyone on earth (apparently) feeling perfectly free to criticize some other human's preferences, I love that you just said this! Both my daughter and daughter-in-law have rather delicate palates and cannot take the heat of chilis, etc. Since heat seems to be the taste du jour, they both have to navigate carefully through eating choices. I will say that I think I should give most foodstuffs one honest taste--not just gulping, but actually tasting. I was sorely tried when on a trip to France with my son and dil, I tried a plate of sea things in Normandy--I don't know how else to describe what appeared on my plate. But I've been somewhat proud of myself that I at least gave it a chance! thanks for a little lightheartedness in this difficult time (yes, I'm a yank). Kate in Oregon

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    1. Thanks for lovely kind comment Kate. I'm pleased you found it so positive. xx

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