Sunday, 21 May 2017

Harira for a Houseful


Red  Mel and Spiky Kay, my chums from the 'Year 2000 Class of St Loye's School of Occupational Therapy'  are with me this weekend.  Our old college upped sticks and merged with Plymouth University years ago and the buildings were knocked down to make room for a swanky retirement village.  But our friendship has survived the test of time.  We lunched on the harbour, perused the shops and came home to crafting.  I'll show you what we've made tomorrow.   Supper was three home cooked courses.  The starter was tiropites, tasty cheesy parcels.  I've shared the recipe before.  Louis made a pink iced victoria sponge for dessert.  The kitchen still hasn't quite recovered.  Adolescent cooking is messy!  The main course was harira, a stew that is eaten by Muslims to break their fasting during Ramadam.  It'd be worth waiting for all day as it's delish.  Here's my version of the recipe.

Soak 200g chickpeas overnight and then boil them whilst writing a blog post.  Wait until you can smell burning because they've boiled dry.  Sh*t!!!!!!!  Rescue them just in time!

Fry 450g cubed lamb  in a bit of oil until it colours.  Soften a chopped onion in the pan as well to save on washing up.

Pop the lamb, chickpeas and onion in a slow cooker along with a tin of chopped tomatoes, a chopped red pepper, 2oz Basmati rice, 2oz red lentils, a teaspoon of ginger and salt and pepper.  Top with water and cook on high all day.  That's it.  The recipe called for saffron but I didn't bother with that.  It's expensive and I think that it makes food taste like TCP.

I should have added a bit of chopped parsley and squeezed a lemon over it at the end of cooking time. It would have made it more photogenic.  But I forgot.  It was lovely anyway!



6 comments:

  1. It sounds better than it looks!!

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    1. Yes food cosmetic photographer I am not!!! xx

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  2. It makes me think of Ethiopian food plopped in communal heaps on bread in less than appealing style, but so delicious to taste. The flavors in your stew sound incredible together.

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    1. Yes!! I had Ethiopian food in Seattle many years ago and always remember that meal. It was gorgeous. xx

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  3. Ha! Saffron - I'm glad you share my doubts - I think it tastes of blood but I can see TCP too.

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