Monday, 5 June 2017

That Tidying Book




A period away in my motorhome always makes me reflect on how little stuff I need in my life.  So perhaps it was a good place to read Marie Kondo's  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying.   Here's some of the things that I gained from the book.

  • A deep sense of respect for the things that I own and the part that they play in my life.
  • A way of getting rid of things guilt free by giving thanks for the role that they have played in my life however small.
  • The idea of using what you already have as storage solutions.  A wooden box that we got from the supermarket that contained strawberries was re-purposed as a caddy for my cleaning materials in the bathroom.
  • Anyone who's read the book would guess that I'd read it too by the way my clothes and towels are now stored vertically rather than in a horizontal pile.
  • Even in the small space living environment of the van there is stuff that needs to go because it does not bring joy.  I thought I was pretty minimalist in the van yet there was probably three bin bags worth of stuff to throw away or recycle.   Even though I'd only taken enough clothes away for a week, I no longer own three of the garments anymore.  A pair of holey leggings and a couple of ill fitting swimsuits are gone as they do not fulfil the purpose of bringing joy into my life. 
And just when I thought that I'd been doing pretty well at home lately I'm forced to re-evaluate my decluttering efforts.  Even though about ten bin bags of stuff went in the charity bins just a month ago it seems that there might be a bit more work to do.  After all I'm after spaciousness in my life at both a physical and meta-physical level and don't feel that I've quite achieved it yet.  I'll recommend this as a read to you guys. Even if you don't take on all the principles and adopt Marie Kondo's methods to the letter I think it's guaranteed to give food for thought.

16 comments:

  1. No one needs an ill fitting swimsuit. They're a pig to wear when they fit well.
    I've only read snippets of the book so far. I will now read it properly following your recommendation. X

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    1. Happy reading - see whether you want to take the advice in the book word for word. xx

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  2. I can't bring myself to read it. Why? Because no books clutter my house, I got rid of them all. I have a few library books which get changed every couple of weeks. I am well able to keep my house as tidy as I need it to be, without someone telling me how to. Everything in my house is borrowed, it does not belong to me, when I go it will be passed on to someone else. The only stuff I have relationships with is the stuff I make myself, and a few personal items from my childhood, photographs, and my mothers personal effects. I am a rebel and if anyone tells me what I should be doing, I do the opposite. Lots of lurv xxx

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    1. Ha! I'm a rebel too and not good at doing what I'm told. I've taken snippets of advice and don't buy into the whole method described by the book! xx

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  3. I've not read it. What does she say with regard to disposing of your no longer wanted items? Am just curious and hopeful that it encourages recycling/donating rather than sending to landfill.
    Arilxx

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    1. She doesn't really which is a missed opportunity. I've got two string bags worth of stuff gleaned from the motorhome for recycling. xx

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  4. I read the book and it had little effect on me. Why? Because I am a hoarder, I keep everything! Ridiculous. One of my main problems is getting rid of clothes that I don't particularly like, because of the money spent. I have, however, stopped buying so much stuff, it's a small start. BTW, love your blog.😊

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    1. Glad you like my blog. She does have an answer about getting rid of stuff that you wouldn't usually because of the expense that I found quite helpful. xx

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  5. I bought the book in desperation as I needed not only to declutter my home but my headspace too. I was quite good at first....loads went out, charity shop, recycled, rehomed etc. Then after the intial flush of success, I lent the book out - and I have slowly slid back into my slovenly ways! sigh. Need to reassess my need for stuff to be out and about and not either put away or removed. Main obsticle does have to be the three men in my life - they don't like to let go of stuff, even if they dont need/like/want .... their (collective answer is ... we might need/like/want it in the future.... (clue - I threw away - secretly - long past wearing clothing of husbands that I knew he had when I met him as a student - shhhhhh)

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    1. Yes - one of my obstacles is that I live with a teenager with a tendency for hoarding too. Hope my example might rub off. Not looking like it will any time soon though. xx

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  6. I read it. I kind of lost interest when she said to take everything out of her hand bag and then put it back in its home to only take it out again in the morning. I also have all of my tops in the drawers on their end. It did make me purge. I didnt have huge amounts in the beginning, but somethings I had saved as people had given them to me. I had people over and said there are bags in the porch to go to the charity, take anything you want. They took a lot of things. I have seen some bits in one of their kitchens and it makes me smile that they love them!

    Hope you are well.

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    1. Yes I didn't get the handbag thing either. However I do have a regular tidying out in mine. It's amazing how much junk accumulates after only a couple of days. xx

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  7. Wow - talk about timely. We're in the midst of downsizing for a future move to a smaller place. This should be mandatory reading for my husband, who's having a hard time letting go of useless objects.

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    1. Godd luck with getting him to read it. He may resist!! xx

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  8. A handbag?! I use the pockets in my gilets to carry the essentials:- credit cards, phone, hanky, anti-inflammatories and keys. That comes from riding motorbikes, when a handbag would have looked ridiculous.

    I could no more de-clutter than run a mile.

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    1. Each to their own! I am a quite recent handbag user. Pockets sufficed until about ten years ago. xx

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