Friday, 2 March 2018

Driving in the Snow


It occurred to me when looking at this picture that the bloke, for  in those days they were probably the only ones allowed to drive cars,  was probably more skilled at driving in the snow than me.  The climate seemed a bit different in the olden days.  I made an executive decision to go into the office yesterday morning after a discussion with my boss.  It seemed that only the admin staff would make it in and, as the road was clear outside, I thought I'd give it a go and support them.  No problems getting to work but as the snow came down later in the morning we were given the order by those on high to bale out before the worst of the storm came in.

I made it home without damage to life or limb or Little Blue but it was a hairy journey.  I was shaking when I reached the front door.  My brakes didn't want to work a couple of times on the ring road.  Luckily I'd worked out that leaving a very sizeable gap between me and the vehicle in front was an absolute essential.  There's a big steep hill up to where I live.  I just about made that in first gear.  Just before my house there's a winding one way system to negotiate.  Even though I was going really slowly I had a little skid around one of the corners.    I was as bossy as I could be when I told the secretaries to leave at the same time.  They both dithered and left just twenty minutes later. As well as far more unsettling drives they both had to abandon cars and had long walks home.

Driving in the snow was so difficult as it is not really in the range of my experience.  It's not just car handling techniques where I'm a novice but gauging the consequences of the weather conditions is a mystery too.  Just how long would it taking in near blizzard conditions for a road to become  impassible?   I haven't really got a clue.  So learn by my experience.  Stay safe people!

12 comments:

  1. Big snow drifts around our way, no getting anywhere for a few days and that's a horse-drawn carriage in the painting. They used to put sacking over the horse's feet to help them get a grip on the roads

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    1. Ha! I didn't see the horse! Stay warm. xx

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  2. I’m venturing out on foot today, Julie, the first time since Monday and I’ll be taking my walking pole just for security where the snow is deep. I’ve unearthed 10 years old boots and will look like a yeti by the time the time get out the door. Keep safe. Catriona

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    1. Ah walking poles. That's a good idea. I'll take mine to Somerset. xx

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  3. Drove in snow and ice when we lived in Colorado, sometimes as late as May and decided winter driving was not for me.

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    1. I don't mind it as much in countries that are geared up for it. We're certainly not! xx

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  4. I'm sure neither cars, roads, maintenance, and drivers get enough experience with the stuff. I'm tired of snow this winter and even with it seemingly twice weekly, I have white knuckles clutching the steering wheel. Keep safe.

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    1. I do remember times when we tired of snow in Eastern England in the '70s. My grandpa was poorly (and subsequently passed away) during a spell when we were snowed in. I remember the daily snowy walks with my mum who was looking after him. xx

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  5. I enjoyed your article on driving in the snow. If you lived, where I live, you would get used to it. In my whole life, I only remember school closing 3 times. We are a hardy (or crazy) lot and just forge ahead in all kinds of weather. Now, I have noticed that out in the country, where the land is very flat and the wind whips up the snow, schools have been closed a few times in the last couple of years. Driving is a learned skill - good distances between vehicles, drive slowly, head for a snowy edge instead of staying in the slippery tracks when attempting to stop in icy conditions. We also get exhaust fog out of the rear of the vehicles on some days. It impedes your vision so each car waits until it clears before driving. So, only about 3 - 4 vehicles can clear a red stop light at one time. Interesting driving in winter!
    Myra, from Winnipeg, Canada

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    1. Lovely comment. Yes I had the sense that driving in more hairy conditions is something that can be learnt. xx

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  6. I am so glad that I have retired from driving.

    I am so fed up with this snow, it snowed all day and night yesterday and today it started in the afternoon and is still doing it and gusting as well.

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    1. Clear here now. Off to Somerset where it's a little more problemmatic. See today's post. xx

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